black. mother. womanist. queer. writer. veg. lover

Showing 17 posts tagged Michelle Obama

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Michelle Obama and Kerry Washington visit a local Washington DC School

Kerry Washington is a member of the President’s Committee On The Arts and Humanities. (Story on their visit to the school.)

(Source: makomori)

He’s always asking: ‘Is that new? I haven’t seen that before.’ It’s like, Why don’t you mind your own business? Solve world hunger. Get out of my closet.

Michelle Obama (sartorial-living just-throw l ohmuffins l umcanyounot)

I heard that, Michelle.

(via sequinsandsideeye)

LOL!!!! I just laughed so hard at that because I imagined the side-eye/eye roll combo that MUST accompany that retort.

(via verbal-purification)

yes! i can just imagine the vicious eye roll that went with this.

(via blkgirlblogging)

Ramblings on Black Motherhood

The Clutch Mag article this week titled, “A Black Mom-in-Chief is Revolutionary” really spoke to me as a revolutionary mother. As a college student I was known for speaking out on anti-Black and racist issues across campus, as well as demonstrating for various on-campus injustices. I graduated and continued working toward my “radical” ideals of equality through classroom teaching. After 2 ½ years of teaching I got pregnant.

No longer was I the revolutionary, Black activist woman, but I became simply a mother—and a stay-at-home mother at that. My choices in motherhood and staying with my sun were seen as opposing the beliefs I had espoused. Having a child restricted me in certain ways that made me seem less dedicated to being an educator or activist. I won’t pretend that my sun hasn’t changed the path I was on, but I think he has also given me a lot of clarity and focus.

For me personally, motherhood has expanded my interests and my views on what issues are important to me and my sun. I am revolutionary through my parenting and my expanding sense of what issues are critical to a group of women that are often forgotten when discussing radicalism and revolutionary lifestyles, mothers. The parenting choices I make, as well as the choices I reject are revolutionary. I will continue to make revolutionary choices because raising a Black child has to be revolutionary.

I have to defend my 1 year old’s Blackness when we go to a playground that is predominantly white and he strikes fear in parents. I have to resist friends and family defining what my sun’s masculinity will or will not mean. I have to stand up for his right to define what type of adult he will become. I will have to define my sun’s Blackness when he enters school and will also have to re-teach him topics that were taught through the lens of white supremacy. I will have to teach my sun whether to resist or embrace ideologies that will be presented to him outside of our household. I have to teach him not only what I believe are the right paths, but also how to avoid the many ways Black men can get caught in the system.

There is so much more that is hard to explain to anyone who isn’t a parent, but especially to the white feminist and Alice Walker disciples who holds their stance on motherhood to be antithetical to revolutionary womanist thought and action. If raising a Black child in Amerika isn’t revolutionary in it’s damn self then I don’t know what is. 

Children, Body Politics & Exercise

theblackamericanprincess:

Reflecting on the post about Michelle Obama from last night I think that perhaps people are generally overcritical when it comes to exercise and weight. While there are campaigns that are intentionally body shaming, “Let’s Move” is not one of them. 

There is nothing wrong with promoting exercise to children in a way that is fun and entertaining by infusing Beyonce songs and spotlights on exercise into favorite children’s tv shows. When people talk about the fact that there also needs to be a component of body acceptance, I do agree, but I think MOST important is offering exercise as a choice to every able child.

As someone who has worked extensively with children and seen the various ways that children are continually shamed and mistreated by parents, students AND teachers I know that the need is real for some sort of comprehensive health programming (but then again when basic needs for education aren’t being met let’s be realistic about the chances of that happening).

Exercise for children is about much more than simply their weights or BMI, it is about promoting a lifestyle which many children do not actively see, it is about engaging them in an activity when many low-income and urban schools have cut all gym programs. Have you ever seen a child go through a full day of school without any exercise? I’ll give you a hint: everyone suffers. Exercise is a fundamental part of childhood that is increasingly being replaced with screen time. 

Anyone who has started (or maintains) an exercise regimen can attest to the fact that it is more than just about their body. Exercising increases endorphins and regardless of your weight/size can make you feel more positively about yourself. This is especially true of children. Exercising is mental as well as physical. 

I completely understand the fact that people are unhappy with the execution of “Let’s Move,” but there is nothing wrong with the message that exercise is an important life tool that is necessary for children.

Children, Body Politics & Exercise

Reflecting on the post about Michelle Obama from last night I think that perhaps people are generally overcritical when it comes to exercise and weight. While there are campaigns that are intentionally body shaming, “Let’s Move” is not one of them. 

There is nothing wrong with promoting exercise to children in a way that is fun and entertaining by infusing Beyonce songs and spotlights on exercise into favorite children’s tv shows. When people talk about the fact that there also needs to be a component of body acceptance, I do agree, but I think MOST important is offering exercise as a choice to every able child.

As someone who has worked extensively with children and seen the various ways that children are continually shamed and mistreated by parents, students AND teachers I know that the need is real for some sort of comprehensive health programming (but then again when basic needs for education aren’t being met let’s be realistic about the chances of that happening).

Exercise for children is about much more than simply their weights or BMI, it is about promoting a lifestyle which many children do not actively see, it is about engaging them in an activity when many low-income and urban schools have cut all gym programs. Have you ever seen a child go through a full day of school without any exercise? I’ll give you a hint: everyone suffers. Exercise is a fundamental part of childhood that is increasingly being replaced with screen time. 

Anyone who has started (or maintains) an exercise regimen can attest to the fact that it is more than just about their body. Exercising increases endorphins and regardless of your weight/size can make you feel more positively about yourself. This is especially true of children. Exercising is mental as well as physical. 

I completely understand the fact that people are unhappy with the execution of “Let’s Move,” but there is nothing wrong with the message that exercise is an important life tool that is necessary for children.

As much as I love Michelle Obama.

sourcedumal:

the-bitch-goddess-success:

And I mean adore

I think her war on childhood obesity needs to be…re-examined. She needs to make it clear that being overweight does NOT necessarily mean you’re unhealthy and that it’s okay to be fat. I think when you deal with kids especially, you need to reiterate that your body type is okay. Period. 

There is quite a bit of body shaming and ableism in her ‘move’ plan that needs to truly be addressed.

Yes, having children exercise is a good thing, but for a great portion of fat people, exercise is nothing more than another reminder that ‘my body isn’t good enough because it is fat.’ And it completely ignores those who literally CANNOT move due to disability.

Not to mention the fact that there is little to no active involvement in helping nutritional access to poor areas. I’ve seen nothing in her plan mentioning eliminating food deserts.

Although I agree with many of your points Michelle did in fact attempt to do work toward eliminating food desserts in both Chicago and DC at least. I know in DC though part of her plan was partnering with Wal-Mart to bring multiple Wal-Mart groceries into the city and we have been fighting back against it. In that case I can’t fault her for ignoring the issue, but rather in poor execution. 

(via afrafemme)

I’m just pondering the differences in the ways the media treated Betty Ford and how they treat Michelle Obama. It amazes me—though, perhaps it shouldn’t—that Michelle Obama gets the short end of the stick compared to a woman who was clearly drunk 90% of the time. The media treated one with sympathy and the other with scorn. Could you IMAGINE the media frenzy if Michelle Obama was an alcoholic? Would the media try its best to keep Obama’s secret like they did with Ford? #MeThinksNot
Son of Baldwin (via sonofbaldwin)

(via afrafemme)